DictionaryThesaurusScrabbleExamplesQuiz

take

EN[teɪk] [tʰeɪ̯k] [-eɪk]
UK US
WTake
  • A take is a single continuous recorded performance. The term is used in film and music to denote and track the stages of production.

    Definition of take in English Dictionary

  • NounPLtakes
    1. The or an act of taking.
      1. Something that is taken; a haul.
        1. He wants half of the take if he helps with the job. ‎
        2. The mayor is on the take. ‎
      2. An interpretation or view, opinion or assessment; perspective.
        1. What's your take on this issue, Fred? ‎
      3. An approach, a (distinct) treatment.
        1. a new take on a traditional dish ‎
      4. (film) A scene recorded (filmed) at one time, without an interruption or break; a recording of such a scene.
        1. It's a take. ‎
        2. Act seven, scene three, take two. ‎
      5. (music) A recording of a musical performance made during an uninterrupted single recording period.
        1. A visible (facial) response to something, especially something unexpected; a facial gesture in response to an event.
          1. did a double-take and then a triple-take
          2. I did a take when I saw the new car in the driveway. ‎
        2. (medicine) An instance of successful inoculation/vaccination.
          1. (rugby, cricket) A catch of the ball (in cricket, especially one by the wicket-keeper).
            1. (printing) The quantity of copy given to a compositor at one time.
            2. VerbSGtakesPRtakingPTtookPPtaken
              1. VT To get into one's hands, possession, or control, with or without force.
                1. take a pen off the desk ‎; they took Charlton's gun from his cold, dead hands ‎
                2. I'll take that plate off the table. ‎;
                3. take the guards prisoner ‎; take prisoners ‎
                4. After a bloody battle, they were able to take the city. ‎
                5. took ten catfish in one afternoon ‎
                6. Billy took her pencil ‎
                7. take a toll ‎; take revenge ‎
                8. took the next two tricks ‎; took Smith's rook ‎
              2. VT To receive or accept (something) (especially something given or bestowed, awarded, etc).
                1. took third place ‎; took bribes ‎
                2. the camera takes 35mm film ‎
                3. the store doesn't take checks ‎; she wouldn't take any money for her help ‎; do you take credit? ‎
                4. the vending machine only takes bills, it doesn't take coins ‎
                5. take my advice ‎
                6. take a wife ‎; the school only takes new students in the fall ‎; the therapist wouldn't take him as a client ‎
                7. There was no intestacy, and they did not take under the will as heirs, [ …]
              3. VT To remove.
                1. take two egg from the cartoon ‎
                2. the earthquake took many lives ‎; the plague took rich and poor alike ‎
                3. cancer took her life ‎; he took his life last night ‎
                4. take one from three and you are left with two ‎
              4. VT To have sex with.
                1. VT To defeat (someone or something) in a fight.
                  1. Don't try to take that guy. He's bigger than you. ‎
                  2. The woman guarding us looks like a professional, but I can take her! ‎
                2. VT To grasp or grip.
                  1. he took her hand in his ‎
                3. VT To select or choose; to pick.
                  1. take whichever bag you like ‎
                  2. she took the best men with her and left the rest to garrison the city ‎
                  3. I'll take the blue plates. ‎
                4. VT To adopt (select) as one's own.
                  1. she took his side in every argument ‎
                  2. take a stand on the important issues ‎
                5. VT To carry or lead (something or someone).
                  1. she took her sword with her everywhere she went ‎
                  2. I'll take the plate with me. ‎
                  3. The next bus will take you to Metz. ‎
                  4. I took him for a ride ‎; I took him down to London. ‎
                  5. These stairs take you down to the basement. ‎
                  6. Stone Street took us right past the store. ‎
                  7. she took the steps two or three at a time ‎; he took the curve / corner too fast ‎
                  8. The pony took every hedge and fence in its path. ‎
                  9. He took her to lunch at the new restaurant, took her to the movies, and then took her home. ‎
                  10. Nicholas then took himself to Avignon where in August 1330 he formally renounced his claim to the papacy.
                6. VT To use as a means of transportation.
                  1. take the ferry ‎; I took a plane ‎
                  2. he took the bus to London, and then took a train to Manchester ‎
                7. OBS To visit; to include in a course of travel.
                  1. VT To obtain for use by payment or lease.
                    1. she took a condo at the beach for the summer ‎; he took a full-page ad in the Times ‎
                    2. they took two magazines ‎
                    3. I used to take The Sunday Times. ‎
                  2. VT To consume.
                    1. take two of these and call me in the morning ‎; take the blue pill ‎
                    2. I take aspirin every day to thin my blood. ‎
                    3. the general took dinner at seven o'clock ‎; I'll take two sugars in my coffee, please. ‎
                  3. VT To experience, undergo, or endure.
                    1. take sun-baths ‎; take a shower ‎; she made the decision to take chemotherapy ‎
                    2. she takes pride in her work ‎; I take offence at that ‎
                    3. to take a dislike ‎; to take pleasure in his opponent's death ‎
                    4. took a pay cut ‎; take a joke ‎; the hull took a lot of punishment before it broke ‎
                    5. I can take the noise, but I can't take the smell. ‎
                    6. That truck bed will only take two tons. ‎
                    7. She took a vacation to France but spent the whole time feeling miserable that her husband couldn't be there with her. ‎
                    8. Aren't you supposed to take your math final today? ‎
                    9. I had to take a pee. ‎
                    10. the ship took a direct hit and was destroyed ‎; her career took a hit ‎
                  4. VT To cause to change to a specified state or condition.
                    1. VT To regard in a specified way.
                      1. he took the news badly ‎
                    2. VT To conclude or form (a decision or an opinion) in the mind.
                      1. took the decision to close its last remaining outlet ‎
                      2. took a dim view of city officials ‎
                    3. VT To understand (especially in a specified way).
                      1. Don't take my comments as an insult. ‎
                      2. if she took my meaning ‎
                    4. VT To accept or be given (rightly or wrongly); assume (especially as if by right).
                      1. He took all the credit for the project, although he had done almost none of the work. ‎
                      2. She took the blame, in the public's eyes, although the debacle was more her husband's fault than her own. ‎
                    5. VT To believe, to accept the statements of.
                      1. take her word for it ‎; take him at his word ‎
                    6. VT To asume or suppose; to reckon; to regard or consider.
                      1. take it from her comments she won't be there. ‎
                      2. I took him to be a person of honor. ‎; He was often taken to be a man of means. ‎
                      3. Do you take me for a fool? ‎; Do you take me to be stupid? ‎
                      4. Looking at him as he came into the room, I took him for his father. ‎
                    7. VT To draw, derive, or deduce (a meaning from something).
                      1. I'm not sure what moral to take from that story. ‎
                    8. VT To derive (as a title); to obtain from a source.
                      1. "As I Lay Dying" takes its title from Book XI of Homer's "Odyssey" ‎
                    9. VT To catch or contract (an illness, etc).
                      1. took ill ‎; took a chill ‎
                    10. VT To come upon or catch (in a particular state or situation).
                      1. The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. [ …] The second note, the high alarum, not so familiar and always important since it indicates the paramount sin in Man's private calendar, took most of them by surprise although they had been well prepared.
                    11. VT To captivate or charm; to gain or secure the interest or affection of.
                      1. took her fancy ‎; took her attention ‎
                    12. VT (of cloth, paper, etc) To absorb or be impregnated by (dye, ink, etc); to be susceptible to being treated by (polish, etc).
                      1. cloth that takes dye well ‎; paper that takes ink ‎; the leather that takes a certain kind of polish ‎
                    13. VT (of a ship) To let in (water).
                      1. VT To require.
                        1. it takes a while to get used to the smell ‎
                        2. Looks like it's gonna take a taller person to get that down.   Finishing this on schedule will take a lot of overtime. ‎
                      2. VT To proceed to fill.
                        1. He took a seat in the front row. ‎
                      3. VT To fill, to use up (time or space).
                        1. hunting that whale takes most of his free time ‎; his collection takes a lot of space ‎
                        2. The trip will take about ten minutes. ‎
                      4. VT To avail oneself of.
                        1. he took that opportunity to leave France ‎
                      5. VT To perform, to do.
                        1. take a walk ‎; take action/steps/measures to fight drug abuse ‎; take a trip ‎; take aim ‎; take the tempo slowly ‎
                        2. The kick is taken from where the foul occurred. ‎; Pirès ran in to take the kick. ‎; The throw-in is taken from the point where the ball crossed the touch-line. ‎}}
                      6. VT To assume or perform (a form or role).
                        1. took the form of a duck ‎; took shape ‎; a god taking the likeness of a bird ‎
                        2. take the part of the villain/hero ‎
                        3. take office ‎; take the throne ‎
                      7. VT To bind oneself by.
                        1. he took the oath of office last night ‎
                      8. VT To move into.
                        1. the witness took the stand ‎; the next team took the field ‎
                      9. VT To go into, through, or along.
                        1. go down two blocks and take the next left ‎; take the path of least resistance ‎
                      10. VT To have or take recourse to.
                        1. take cover/shelter/refuge ‎
                      11. VT To ascertain or determine by measurement, examination or inquiry.
                        1. take her pulse / temperature / blood pressure ‎; take a census ‎
                      12. VT To write down; to get in, or as if in, writing.
                        1. he took a mental inventory of his supplies ‎; she took careful notes ‎
                      13. VT To make (a photograph, film, or other reproduction of something).
                        1. she took a video of their encounter ‎; could you take a picture of us? ‎; the police took his fingerprints ‎
                      14. VT (dated) To take a picture, photograph, etc of (a person, scene, etc).
                        1. The photographer will take you sitting down. ‎
                        2. to take a group/scene ‎
                      15. VT To obtain money from, especially by swindling.
                        1. took me for ten grand ‎
                      16. VT (now chiefly by enrolling in a class or course) To apply oneself to the study of.
                        1. as a child, she took ballet ‎
                        2. I plan to take math, physics, literature and flower arrangement this semester. ‎
                      17. VT To deal with.
                        1. take matters as they arise ‎
                      18. VT To consider in a particular way, or to consider as an example.
                        1. I've had a lot of problems recently: take last Monday, for example. My car broke down on the way to work. Then ... etc. ‎
                      19. VT (baseball) To decline to swing at (a pitched ball); to refrain from hitting at, and allow to pass.
                        1. He'll probably take this one. ‎
                      20. VT (grammar) To have an be used with (a certain grammatical form, etc).
                        1. This verb takes the dative; that verb takes the genitive. ‎
                      21. VI To get or accept (something) into one's possession.
                        1. My husband and I have a dysfunctional marriage. He just takes and takes; he never gives. ‎
                      22. VI To engage, take hold or have effect.
                        1. the dye didn't take
                        2. not all grafts take
                        3. I started some tomato seeds last spring, but they didn't take. ‎
                        4. At the depot, Hook climbed out, slamming the door twice before the latch took.
                        5. Each wit may praise it for his own dear sake, / And hint he writ it, if the thing should take.
                        6. "When I was young," I said, "I was vaccinated with religion, but the vaccination didn't take."
                      23. VI To become; to be affected in a specified way.
                        1. They took ill within 3 hours. ‎; She took sick with the flu. ‎
                      24. VI (possibly dated) To be able to be accurately or beautifully photographed.
                        1. VI (dialectal, proscribed).
                          1. VT OBS To deliver, give (something) to (someone).
                            1. VT (obsolete outside dialects and slang) To give or deliver (a blow, to someone); to strike or hit.
                              1. He took me a blow on the head. ‎
                          2. More Examples
                            1. Used in the Middle of Sentence
                              • The optical micrographs of the samples were taken by the model inverted phase contrast, μ-scope, Nikon-Eclipse, TE-2000 μ & Nikon Digital camera DXM 1200F.
                              • Stop taking my food from the fridge! That goes for you too, Nick!
                              • Although it takes slightly longer to perform than midline laparostomy, same principles of managing the open abdomen can be applied without additional equipment.
                            2. Used in the Beginning of Sentence
                              • taking the whimseys of a feverish brain for the calm revelation of truth. — Bancroft.
                              • Taken together, AKI in CLP models is the result of an ischemic coecum and a faecal peritonitis of an unpredictable degree [ 15 ].
                              • Take heart, help will arrive shortly and everything will be fine.
                            3. Used in the Ending of Sentence
                              • When the wombat-riding chimp jumped onto the bar, Smith, who had been enjoying a beer, did a massive spit take.
                              • Each wit may praise it for his own dear sake, / And hint he writ it, if the thing should take.
                              • At the depot, Hook climbed out, slamming the door twice before the latch took.
                          • Part-of-Speech Hierarchy
                            1. Nouns
                              • Countable nouns
                              • Verbs
                                • Intransitive verbs
                                  • Transitive verbs
                                    • Verbs by inflection type
                                      • Irregular verbs
                                  Related Links:
                                  1. en taken
                                  2. en takes
                                  3. en taketh
                                  4. en taker
                                  5. en takeover
                                  Source: Wiktionary
                                   0 0

                                  Meaning of take for the defined word.

                                  Grammatically, this word "take" is a noun, more specifically, a countable noun. It's also a verb, more specifically, an intransitive verb, a transitive verb and a verbs by inflection type.
                                  Difficultness: Level 1
                                  12345678910
                                  Easy     ➨     Difficult
                                  Definiteness: Level 9
                                  12345678910
                                  Definite    ➨     Versatile